3D in 12 Days

April 30, 2009

During June, 13-25, the 14th annual Living Cell Course will take place at the University of British Columbia Medicine School (UBC) in Vancouver, Canada. This residential course concentrates on all aspects of the 3D microscopy of living cells. Designed for biological research scientists and advanced graduate students, who apply – or plan to – modern 3D imaging, the course want to open up-to-date methods to a wider selection of scientists. The aim of this intense course is to bring students and manufacturers together. The course’s topics include amongst others scanning systems like AODs, mirrors and disks, deconvolution of wide-field and confocal data, dye design, poisson noise QE and S/N, calcium imaging, as well as „how to keep cells alive“.
www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/index.htm

Vancouver, Canada (sorce: pixelio.de)

Vancouver, Canada (sorce: pixelio.de)


New Technique to Receive Sharper Images

April 29, 2009

A new imaging method that could help to build more powerful microscopes and other optical devices by producing sharper images and a wider field of view has been developed by Princeton researches. The research was led by Jason Fleischer, assistant professor of electrical engineering and co-written with two graduate students Christopher Barsi and Wenjie Wan. The new method takes advantage of the unusual properties of nonlinear optical materials in which light rays mix with each other in complex ways. Thanks to the mixing of rays, information that would otherwise be lost manages to reach the detector. Therefore this picture would be rich in detail but it would also be distorted. To capture this otherwise lost visual information, the researchers used a hologram. The hologram is a special type of photograph which records „phase“ – a light property which measures the time and location of a wave peak. They also combined data from a normal camera. Then they created a simplified flow of light through a nonlinear material and developed a computer algorithm that takes the distorted image and works backwards to calculate the visual information at every point in space between the image and the object.
www.princeton.edu

An object illuminated by light reflects rays in many different directions (gray arrows). Left: With a normal lens, some rays are captured and refract towards a camera while others are missed, resulting in a blurry image with a limited field of view. Right: The new method uses a nonlinear material. The original rays are altered and new rays (red) are generated. The resulting picture is scrambled, but a computer algorithm can undo the mixing and yield a sharp, wide-field image.

An object illuminated by light reflects rays in many different directions (gray arrows). Left: With a normal lens, some rays are captured and refract towards a camera while others are missed, resulting in a blurry image with a limited field of view. Right: The new method uses a nonlinear material. The original rays are altered and new rays (red) are generated. The resulting picture is scrambled, but a computer algorithm can undo the mixing and yield a sharp, wide-field image. (Image: Christopher Barsi)


Cellular Imaging and Analysis Software Relationship

April 28, 2009

PerkinElmer and Accelrys have announced a software collaboration to enable new single cell imaging and analysis techniques. The cooperation is aimed at providing researchers with capabilities for the detection and analysis of single cells via high content screening (HCS) technologies, for faster and better outcomes in identifying cellular markers associated with human health and disease. PerkinElmer’s Columbus software will provide the images containing single cells as well as large amounts of cell level data, and Accelrys‘ Pipeline Pilot platform will furnish intelligent algorithms and image analysis data transfer capability.
www.perkinelmer.com
www.accelrys.com


Euro Atomic Force Microscopy Forum

April 27, 2009

Asylum Research, in conjunction with IMETUM, Nano Initiative Munich, and Atomic Force F&E, announces the 2nd Euro AFM Forum to be held at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), Garching, Germany, July 1-3, 2009. The event is a conference for AFM researchers to share their cutting-edge research for both materials and life science applications. The forum will combine invited and contributed talks from leading European researchers as well as instructional workshops on AFM equipment. Workshop topics include cell imaging, imaging in liquids, force spectroscopy, electrical characterization and more.
Participants are invited to submit their best AFM image for the Forum Image Contest. An iPod Nano will be awarded for the best image that represents innovative science and has the „cool“ factor. The deadline for submission is June 1, 2009.
www.atomicforce.de/Euro-AFM-Forum-2009.php

Surface of a Chestnut. DC mode in air. Taken by Thomas Gutsmann, Research Center Borstel, Germany

Surface of a Chestnut, DC mode in air. Taken by Thomas Gutsmann, Research Center Borstel, Germany (participant of the 2007 event).


Microbeam Analysis – EMAS 2009

April 24, 2009

The European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) will hold its 11th annual workshop on „Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis“ from May 10-14, 2009 in Gdynia/Rumia, Gdansk, Poland. The main topics are electron probe microanalysis, micro- and nanoanalysis in the natural resources industry, fast energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, electron backscatter diffraction, and three-dimensional microanalysis. Time will also be devoted to problem orientated application of microbeam analysis techniques in fields such as catalysts, composites, glass, sensors, and in cultural heritage, environment, forensics, geology, mineralogy, metallurgy, microelectronics, surfaces and interfaces. The event will take place at the Hotel Spa Faltom, Gdynia/Rumia, Gdansk.
www.emas-web.net

City of Gdansk, Poland (source: pixelio.de)

City of Gdansk, Poland (source: pixelio.de)


Light Microscopy Meets Structural Biology

April 21, 2009

A symposium with a focus on light microscopy and its application in structural biology, organized by the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany will take place form June 22-23, 2009. The symposium aims to bring together structural biologists, cell biologists and light microscopy specialists to explore opportunities and requirements for structural biologists in using different light microscopy techniques and to foster interactions at the interface between structural biology and cell biology.

Planned sessions include:
– Imaging protein-protein interactions
– Protein dynamics
– Correlative light- electron microscopy
– Super-resolution techniques

Deadline for registration is May 3, 2009.
www.embl.org

Heidelberg, Germany (source: pixelio.de)

Heidelberg, Germany (source: pixelio.de)


SPIE Europe Optics and Optoelectronics

April 16, 2009

New applications for EUV, VUV, and x-ray technologies and other topics in photonics will be among highlights of SPIE Europe Optics and Optoelectronics to be held April 20-23, 2009 in Prague, Czech Republic. Approximately 450 papers will be presented in 10 technical conferences on:

– Harnessing Relativistic Plasma Waves as Novel Radiation Sources from Terahertz to X-rays and Beyond
– EUV and X-ray Optics: Synergy between Laboratory and Space
– Damage to VUV, EUV, and X-ray Optics
– Metamaterials
– Nonlinear Optics and Applications
– Photon Counting Applications
– Quantum Optics and Quantum Information Transfer and Processing
– Optical Sensors
– Photonic Crystal Fibres
– Holography: Advances in Classical Holography and Modern Trends

www.spie.org/optics-optoelectronics.xml

Prague, Czech Republic (source: pixelio.de)

Prague, Czech Republic (source: pixelio.de)