Molecular Light Switches for Higher Resolution

Mai 29, 2009

The “Superresolution” research network, founded by the German Ministry of Education and Sciences, demonstrated a new widefield microscopy technology with resolutions better than 20 nanometers. The method is based on special dyes, which’s fluorescence can be optically and reversibly switched on and off in aqueous solutions. The dyes are bond to cellular structures by using a functional group. By switching the dyes on and off, the fluorescence emission is separated in time until only those dye molecules fluoresce that have enough distance to allow their localization as single molecules. After several thousand switching cycles, a total image is constructed (dSTORM – direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy). Involved in the project were the work groups of Prof. Dr. M. Sauer and Prof. Dr. J. Mattay (University of Bielefeld, Germany ), Prof. Dr. K.-H. Drexhage (University of Siegen, Germany), Prof. Dr. J. Enderlein (University of Goettingen, Germany), and Prof. Dr. S. Hell (Max Planck Institute of Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen, Germany).
www.biophotonik.org

Cytoskeleton of a fixed cell. Left: Fluorescence image at standard conditions. Right: dSTORM image using molecular switches.

Cytoskeleton of a fixed cell. Left: Fluorescence image at standard conditions. Right: dSTORM image using molecular switches.

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Lasers and Electro-Optics in Baltimore

Mai 27, 2009

The 2009 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) and The International Quantum Electronics Conference (IQEC) will come to Baltimore Convention Center, US from May 31 to June 5, 2009. The 5-day event features high-quality, cutting-edge optics and photonics programming, tutorials, special symposia, short courses and a full program of networking and social events. PhotonXpo – the exhibit at CLEO, also debuting this year, will feature 350 participating companies showcasing every facet of the optics and photonics industry.
www.cleoconference.org

The Baltimore Convention Center

The Baltimore Convention Center


New Cloaking Technology

Mai 26, 2009

Researchers of Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, US announced that they have created a new type of invisibility cloak which works for all colors of the visible spectrum. This new technology, based on a tapered optical waveguide, is simpler than previous designs and makes it possible to cloak objects of about 50 microns in diameter – roughly the width of a human hair. „All previous attempts at optical cloaking have involved very complicated nanofabrication of metamaterials containing many elements, which makes it very difficult to cloak large objects,“ said Vladimir Shalaev, Purdue University’s Robert and Anne Burnett Professor of Electrical Engineering. „Here, we showed that if a waveguide is tapered properly it acts like a sophisticated nanostructured material.” Previous experiments with metamaterials have been limited to cloaking regions only a few times larger than the wavelengths of visible light. This findings could lead to advances in e.g. cloaking; powerful “hyperlenses” resulting in microscopes 10 times more powerful than today’s; computers and consumer electronics that use light instead of electronic signals to process information; advanced sensors; and more efficient solar collectors. Findings are detailed in a research paper appearing May, 29 in Physical Review Letters.
www.purdue.edu


Frontiers of Electron Microscopy in Materials Sciences

Mai 25, 2009

The Twelfth Frontiers of Electron Microscopy in Materials Science, FEMMS2009, will take place from Sept. 27 – Oct. 2, 2009 at “Huis Ten Bosch” in Sasebo/Nagasaki in Kyushu Island, Japan. FEMMS is an international a biennial symposium series focused on the application of electron microscopy, primarily TEM, in the field of materials science. The conference contains a plenary talk, 9 sessions of invited talks and poster sessions of contributed papers. The sessions cover recent progresses and emerging trends, such as current instrument advances in TEM, SEM, HVEM and detecting systems, ultra-high resolution imaging and analysis, in-situ and ultra-fast analysis, 3-dimensional analysis, and so on. Dr. Akira Tonomura, a world renowned pioneer in the field of electron holography, will give a plenary talk as the distinguished lectureship award winner.
www.femms2009.org

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Jury of Small World Photomicrography Competition

Mai 20, 2009

Nikon has announced the judges for the Small World Photomicrography Competition 2009: Gary G. Borisy (Director and CEO of the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole MA, US ), Charles Krebs (Photographer, Washington State, US), James Shreeve (Science Editor at National Geographic), Clive Thompson (Journalist) and judges consultant Michael W. Davidson (Director of the Optical and Magneto-Optical Imaging Center at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, US). Nearly 2,000 images from around the globe have been submitted. The winners are anticipated to be announced in October 2009.
www.nikonsmallworld.com


Tobias Kippenberg Awarded Fresnel Prize

Mai 19, 2009

For his fundamental contributions to the field of optomechanics Prof. Tobias Kippenberg, leader of the independent Max Planck junior research group “Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements” at Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching, Germany and tenure track assistant professor at the ETH Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland, is honoured with the Fresnel Prize in Fundamental Aspects of the European Physical Society (EPS). This award endowed with a prize money of €3000 is given by the “Quantum Electronics and Optics Division” of EPS biannually on the occasion of the “Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) Europe”, held during the “World of Photonics” Congress in Munich, Germany. The prize for Tobias Kippenberg as well as the other EPS-awards will be presented in a ceremony on June 16, 2009.
www.mpq.mpg.de


Microscopy and Microanalysis Conference

Mai 18, 2009

The Microscopy & Microanalysis 2009 Conference, which is the annual meeting of the Microscopy Society of America and the Microbeam Analysis Society, will take place from July 26-30, 2009 in Richmond, Virginia, US. This year’s conference is co-sponsored by the International Metallographic Society. The event addresses to scientists, technologists and students who use microscopy or microanalysis in their research. Topics of the full-day short courses include electron tomography, digital imaging, FIB methodologies, variable pressure and environmental SEM imaging and analysis, cryo EM and interpretation of metallographic microstructures. Over 30 symposia focus on applications in both the biological and physical sciences as well as recent and emerging trends in instrumentation and techniques. Further, contributed sessions, tutorial sessions, poster presentations as well as round-table discussions will be held. www.internationalmetallographicsociety.org
http://mm2009.microscopy.org