Localization Microscopy Using GFP

Juli 30, 2009

Scientists at Heidelberg University, Germany have developed a new technique for localization microscopy, the “spectral precision distance microscopy” (SPDM). Using visible light, this method allows a single molecule resolution of celullar structures down to the range of few nanometer, about 20 times better than the conventional optical resolution. The researchers invented a new instrument which is a combination of the world’s fastest nano light microscope for 3D cell analysis and the new SPDM technique. Prof. Christoph Cremer of the Kirchhoff Institute of Physics and his team were able to show that SPDM can be realized by common fluorescent dyes, such as the green fluorescent protein (GFP) which can be switched on and off by means of light, as long as certain photophysical conditions are fulfilled. This can be achieved via the so-called “reversible photobleaching” of the dye. So far, only special fluorescent dyes could be used as temporally convertible light signals. According to Cremer there are millions of specimens containing gene constructs with dyes from the GFP group available in biomedical laboratories all over the world. They could be put into immediate use for this new kind of localization microscopy.
www.uni-heidelberg.de

Advertisements

Spectroscopy Meeting

Juli 29, 2009

Thermo Fisher Scientific will hold its 2009 Spectroscopy User Meeting from September 14-15, 2009 in Stratford, UK. The event will cover an evening applications workshop on September, 14 and a free of charge scientific programme on September, 15. The scientific programme will feature talks from spectroscopy instrument users. In addition applications specialists will be providing an update on recent advances in the use of infra-red, near infra-red, Raman and UV spectroscopy. There will also be the opportunity to see current generation spectroscopy systems in operation and see how sample handling and data analysis tools have changed over the years.
www.thermo.com/ukscievents


Frontiers of Electron Microscopy in Materials Sciences

Mai 25, 2009

The Twelfth Frontiers of Electron Microscopy in Materials Science, FEMMS2009, will take place from Sept. 27 – Oct. 2, 2009 at “Huis Ten Bosch” in Sasebo/Nagasaki in Kyushu Island, Japan. FEMMS is an international a biennial symposium series focused on the application of electron microscopy, primarily TEM, in the field of materials science. The conference contains a plenary talk, 9 sessions of invited talks and poster sessions of contributed papers. The sessions cover recent progresses and emerging trends, such as current instrument advances in TEM, SEM, HVEM and detecting systems, ultra-high resolution imaging and analysis, in-situ and ultra-fast analysis, 3-dimensional analysis, and so on. Dr. Akira Tonomura, a world renowned pioneer in the field of electron holography, will give a plenary talk as the distinguished lectureship award winner.
www.femms2009.org

topmain


Microscopy and Microanalysis Conference

Mai 18, 2009

The Microscopy & Microanalysis 2009 Conference, which is the annual meeting of the Microscopy Society of America and the Microbeam Analysis Society, will take place from July 26-30, 2009 in Richmond, Virginia, US. This year’s conference is co-sponsored by the International Metallographic Society. The event addresses to scientists, technologists and students who use microscopy or microanalysis in their research. Topics of the full-day short courses include electron tomography, digital imaging, FIB methodologies, variable pressure and environmental SEM imaging and analysis, cryo EM and interpretation of metallographic microstructures. Over 30 symposia focus on applications in both the biological and physical sciences as well as recent and emerging trends in instrumentation and techniques. Further, contributed sessions, tutorial sessions, poster presentations as well as round-table discussions will be held. www.internationalmetallographicsociety.org
http://mm2009.microscopy.org


Cellular Imaging and Analysis Software Relationship

April 28, 2009

PerkinElmer and Accelrys have announced a software collaboration to enable new single cell imaging and analysis techniques. The cooperation is aimed at providing researchers with capabilities for the detection and analysis of single cells via high content screening (HCS) technologies, for faster and better outcomes in identifying cellular markers associated with human health and disease. PerkinElmer’s Columbus software will provide the images containing single cells as well as large amounts of cell level data, and Accelrys‘ Pipeline Pilot platform will furnish intelligent algorithms and image analysis data transfer capability.
www.perkinelmer.com
www.accelrys.com


Microbeam Analysis – EMAS 2009

April 24, 2009

The European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) will hold its 11th annual workshop on „Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis“ from May 10-14, 2009 in Gdynia/Rumia, Gdansk, Poland. The main topics are electron probe microanalysis, micro- and nanoanalysis in the natural resources industry, fast energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, electron backscatter diffraction, and three-dimensional microanalysis. Time will also be devoted to problem orientated application of microbeam analysis techniques in fields such as catalysts, composites, glass, sensors, and in cultural heritage, environment, forensics, geology, mineralogy, metallurgy, microelectronics, surfaces and interfaces. The event will take place at the Hotel Spa Faltom, Gdynia/Rumia, Gdansk.
www.emas-web.net

City of Gdansk, Poland (source: pixelio.de)

City of Gdansk, Poland (source: pixelio.de)


Distinguishing Single Cells With Nothing But Light

April 6, 2009

Researchers at the University of Rochester have developed a novel optical technique that permits rapid analysis of single human immune cells using only light. Andrew Berger, associate professor of optics and his graduate student Zachary Smith integrated Raman and angular-scattering microscopy into a single system, which they call IRAM. This is the first time clear differences between two types of immune cells have been seen using a microscopy system that gathers chemical and structural information by combining two previously distinct optical techniques, according to Berger. „Conceptually it’s pretty straightforward – you shine a specified wavelength of light onto your sample and you get back a large number of peaks spread out like a rainbow,“ says Berger. „The peaks tell you how the molecules you’re studying vibrate and together the vibrations give you the chemical information.“ Until now scientists have not had a non-invasive way to see how human cells, like T cells or cancer cells, activate individually and evolve over time.
www.rochester.edu

IRAM scattering data from a single granulocyte.

IRAM scattering data from a single granulocyte.

IRAM scattering data from a single lymphocyte. Clear differences are visible when compared to data from a granulocyte.

IRAM scattering data from a single lymphocyte. Clear differences are visible when compared to data from a granulocyte.