FEI Joins Metrology Research at University of Albany

Juli 15, 2009

FEI Company, a provider of atomic-scale imaging and analysis systems, and Sematech, the global consortium of chipmakers, announced that FEI has joined Sematech’s Advanced Metrology Development Program at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) of the University at Albany, US. As a member of this program, FEI will collaborate with experts to develop high-resolution capabilities of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and focused ion beam (FIB) technology to address critical needs in process development and defect analysis.
www.fei.com
www.cnse.albany.edu
www.sematech.org

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Scientific CMOS Enables Rapid Frame Rates

Juni 18, 2009

At Laser 2009 – World of Photonics in Munich, Germany, the fastest CMOS ever was introduced. The Scientific CMOS chip enables image acquisitions at 100 frames per second.

Common Imaging Detectors

CCDs and EMCCDs
For CCDs it is feasible to achieve less than 3 electrons RMS readout noise, but due to the serial readout nature of conventional CCDs, this performance comes at the expense of frame rate. Conversely, when CCDs are pushed to faster frame rates, resolution and field of view are sacrificed (i.e. fewer pixels per frame to read out) or read noise and dynamic range suffer. These devices are capable of reading out at 20Mpixel/s per output port with a respectable read noise of only 5 to 6 electrons RMS. At this readout speed a single port 1.3 megapixel sensor can achieve 11 frames/s. The Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD) was introduced into the market in 2000 and represented a significant leap forward in addressing the mutual exclusivity of speed and noise. EMCCD cameras employ an on-chip amplification mechanism called ‘Impact Ionization’ that multiplies the photoelectrons that are generated in the silicon.

CMOS Imaging Sensors (CIS)
CIS are similar to CCD sensors, in so far as they are semiconductor devices with photosensitive areas in each pixel that convert incident photons into electrons. ‘Traditional’ CIS performance has generally been worse than CCDs and their acceptance into scientific markets has been limited due to a reputation of unacceptably high read noise and dark current, lower fill factors, and greater non-uniformity.

Hybrid CCD/CMOS Image Sensors
A hybrid focal plane array is comprised of CMOS Readout Integrated Circuits (ROICs) that are bump bonded to a CCD imaging substrate. By applying a column-parallel readout architecture, the speed versus noise limitations of a conventional CCD can be overcome.

The New Scientific CMOS
Scientific CMOS (sCMOS) can be considered unique in its ability to simultaneously deliver on many key performance parameters, overcoming the ‘mutual exclusivity’ that was earlier discussed in relation to current scientific imaging technology standards, and eradicating the performance drawbacks that have traditionally been associated with conventional CIS. The 5.5 megapixel sensor offers a large field of view and high resolution, without compromising read noise or frame rate. The sensor is capable of achieving 100 full frames/s with a read noise < 3 electrons RMS.

Performance Highlights of the First sCMOS Technology Sensor Include:
– Sensor format 5.5 megapixels 2560 (h) x 2160 (v)Read noise < 2 e- rms @ 30 frames/s; < 3 e- rms @ 100 frames/s
– Maximum frame rate 100 frames/sPixel size 6.5 μm
– Dynamic range 16,000:1 @ 30 frames/s
– QEmax 60%
– Read out modes (user selectable) Rolling and Global Shutter

www.scmos.com/downloads

Scientific CMOS Technology-A High-Performance Imaging Breakthrough

Scientific CMOS Technology-A High-Performance Imaging Breakthrough


Microscopy and Microanalysis Conference

Mai 18, 2009

The Microscopy & Microanalysis 2009 Conference, which is the annual meeting of the Microscopy Society of America and the Microbeam Analysis Society, will take place from July 26-30, 2009 in Richmond, Virginia, US. This year’s conference is co-sponsored by the International Metallographic Society. The event addresses to scientists, technologists and students who use microscopy or microanalysis in their research. Topics of the full-day short courses include electron tomography, digital imaging, FIB methodologies, variable pressure and environmental SEM imaging and analysis, cryo EM and interpretation of metallographic microstructures. Over 30 symposia focus on applications in both the biological and physical sciences as well as recent and emerging trends in instrumentation and techniques. Further, contributed sessions, tutorial sessions, poster presentations as well as round-table discussions will be held. www.internationalmetallographicsociety.org
http://mm2009.microscopy.org


Microbeam Analysis – EMAS 2009

April 24, 2009

The European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) will hold its 11th annual workshop on „Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis“ from May 10-14, 2009 in Gdynia/Rumia, Gdansk, Poland. The main topics are electron probe microanalysis, micro- and nanoanalysis in the natural resources industry, fast energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, electron backscatter diffraction, and three-dimensional microanalysis. Time will also be devoted to problem orientated application of microbeam analysis techniques in fields such as catalysts, composites, glass, sensors, and in cultural heritage, environment, forensics, geology, mineralogy, metallurgy, microelectronics, surfaces and interfaces. The event will take place at the Hotel Spa Faltom, Gdynia/Rumia, Gdansk.
www.emas-web.net

City of Gdansk, Poland (source: pixelio.de)

City of Gdansk, Poland (source: pixelio.de)


RMS Events 2009

Februar 18, 2009

The Royal Microscopical Society (RMS) announced a programme of events for imaging and microscopy taking place in the UK in 2009.

16 March:
NanoFIB Meeting, Oxford, UK

17-20 March:
Microscopy of Semi-Conducting Materials XVI, Oxford, UK

24-25 March:
Capturing Colloids Meeting, Manchester, UK

30-31 March:
Electron Backscatter Diffraction Meeting, Swansea, UK

27 May:
Flow Cytometry Immunophenotyping of Leukaemia & Lymphoma, London, UK

9-12 June:
European Light Microscopy Initiative (ELMI), Glasgow, UK

24-25 June:
UK SPM (Scanning Probe Microscopy Meeting), London, UK

15-17 July:
Flowcytometry UK 2009, Oxford, UK

www.rms.org.uk


FEI Expands Presence in Mineralogy Market

Januar 15, 2009

FEI Company has acquired substantially all of the assets of Intellection Holdings of Brisbane, Australia. Intellection’s primary product is the Qemscan automated mineralogy system. The purchase increases FEI’s presence in the automated mineralogy market for mining companies. The purchase price was approximately $2.8 million. Automated mineralogy systems identify minerals in polished sections of drill core, particulate, or lump materials and quantify a wide range of characteristics, such as mineral abundance, grain size, and liberation.
www.fei.com
www.intellection.com.au


Focus on Microscopy 2009

Januar 9, 2009

From Sunday April 5 to Wednesday April 8, 2009 the Focus on Microscopy (FOM) conference will take place in Krakow, Poland. It is the continuation of a yearly conference series presenting the latest innovations in optical microscopy and its application in biology, medicine and the material sciences. Key subjects are the theory and practice of 3D optical imaging, related 3D image processing, and reporting especially on developments in resolution and imaging modalities. The FOM conference also covers the rapidly advancing fluorescence labeling techniques for the confocal and multiphoton 3D imaging of live- biological-specimens. A technical exhibition will be a special feature of this year’s conference in Krakow.

Upcoming topics will cover:
– Confocal and multiphoton-excitation microscopy
Novel illumination and detection strategies
– Fluorescence: new labels, fluorescent proteins, quantum dots, single molecule

– Time-resolved fluorescence: FRET, FRAP, FLIM, FCS

– Coherent non-linear microscopy: SHG, THG, SFG, CARS

– Raman, light scattering microscopy

– Multi-dimensional imaging

– Sub-wavelength resolution: near field microscopy, STED, PALM

– Laser manipulation, ablation and microdissection, photoactivation

– Optical tools in genomics, proteomics, phenomics, cytometry

– Magnetic resonance and X-ray microscopy

– Image processing and visualization

– Live cell and whole tissue imaging

The conference will take place at the Jagiellonian University Auditorium Maximum, ul. Krupnicza 35, in the center of Krakow.

Details for registration, abstract submission, deadlines, etc. will soon be available on:
www.focusonmicroscopy.org

Krakow, Poland, source: pixelio.de

Krakow, Poland (source: pixelio.de)