3D Movies of Microscopic Systems

Juli 29, 2009

Physicists at New York University (NYU), US have developed a technique to record three-dimensional movies of microscopic systems, such as biological molecules, through holographic video. The technique, developed in the laboratory of NYU Physics Professor David Grier, is comprised of two components: making and recording the images of microscopic systems and then analyzing these images. To generate and record images, the researchers created a holographic microscope. It is based on a conventional light microscope, which uses a collimated laser beam instead of on an incandescent illuminator.
When an object is placed into path of the microscope’s beam, the object scatters some of the beam’s light into a complex diffraction pattern. The scattered light overlaps with the original beam to create an interference pattern reminiscent of overlapping ripples in a pool of water. The microscope then magnifies the resulting pattern of light and dark and records it with a conventional digital video recorder. Each snapshot in the resulting video stream is a hologram of the original object. Unlike a conventional photograph, each holographic snapshot stores information about the three-dimensional structure and composition of the object that created the scattered light field. The recorded holograms appear as a pattern of concentric light and dark rings.
For analyzing the images the researchers based their work on a quantitative theory, the Lorenz-Mie theory, which maintains that the way light is scattered can reveal the size and composition of the object that is scattering it.
The application of the technique ranges from research in fundamental statistical physics to analyzing the composition of fat droplets in milk.
www.nyu.edu

In the microscope, a laser beam illuminates the sample. Light scattered by the sample creates an interference pattern which is magnified and recorded. Then measurements of the particle’s position, size, and refractive index are obtained.

In the microscope, a laser beam illuminates the sample. Light scattered by the sample creates an interference pattern which is magnified and recorded. Then measurements of the particle’s position, size, and refractive index are obtained.

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Frontiers of Electron Microscopy in Materials Sciences

Mai 25, 2009

The Twelfth Frontiers of Electron Microscopy in Materials Science, FEMMS2009, will take place from Sept. 27 – Oct. 2, 2009 at “Huis Ten Bosch” in Sasebo/Nagasaki in Kyushu Island, Japan. FEMMS is an international a biennial symposium series focused on the application of electron microscopy, primarily TEM, in the field of materials science. The conference contains a plenary talk, 9 sessions of invited talks and poster sessions of contributed papers. The sessions cover recent progresses and emerging trends, such as current instrument advances in TEM, SEM, HVEM and detecting systems, ultra-high resolution imaging and analysis, in-situ and ultra-fast analysis, 3-dimensional analysis, and so on. Dr. Akira Tonomura, a world renowned pioneer in the field of electron holography, will give a plenary talk as the distinguished lectureship award winner.
www.femms2009.org

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SPIE Europe Optics and Optoelectronics

April 16, 2009

New applications for EUV, VUV, and x-ray technologies and other topics in photonics will be among highlights of SPIE Europe Optics and Optoelectronics to be held April 20-23, 2009 in Prague, Czech Republic. Approximately 450 papers will be presented in 10 technical conferences on:

– Harnessing Relativistic Plasma Waves as Novel Radiation Sources from Terahertz to X-rays and Beyond
– EUV and X-ray Optics: Synergy between Laboratory and Space
– Damage to VUV, EUV, and X-ray Optics
– Metamaterials
– Nonlinear Optics and Applications
– Photon Counting Applications
– Quantum Optics and Quantum Information Transfer and Processing
– Optical Sensors
– Photonic Crystal Fibres
– Holography: Advances in Classical Holography and Modern Trends

www.spie.org/optics-optoelectronics.xml

Prague, Czech Republic (source: pixelio.de)

Prague, Czech Republic (source: pixelio.de)