Methods and Applications of Fluorescence

August 14, 2009

The 11th International Conference on Methods and Applications of Fluorescence: Spectroscopy, Imaging and Probes will be held in Budapest, Hungary, from September 6-9, 2009. The venue of the Conference is the Congress Center of the oldest Hungarian University, the Eötvös Loránd University.
The meeting will cover the following scientific topics:

– Fluorescence Spectroscopy (Theory and Applications)
– Fluorescence Correlation and Single Molecule Spectroscopy
– Fluorescence in Biology/Medicine: Bioassays, Biophysics
– Special Fluorescent Imaging Techniques: Multi-Photon, Live Cell and Single Molecule Imaging
– Novel Fluorescent Probes, Sensors, Fluorescent Proteins, Quantum Dots, Nanomaterials and their Applications
– Special Fluorescence Techniques: Upconversion, Delayed Fluorescence, Fast Fluorescence Kinetics FRET, etc.
– Fluorescence Microscopy: Towards Higher Spatial and Temporal Resolution
– Fluorescence in Systems Biology High Throughput Screening Assays, Arrays, Micro-chip

www.maf11.hu

Budapest, Hungary

Budapest, Hungary


Live Cell Imaging at Double the Resolution

Mai 6, 2009

A team of researchers of the University of Georgia (UGA) and the University of California, San Francisco, US has developed a microscope that is capable of live imaging at double the resolution of fluorescence microscopy by using structured illumination. The research was published in Nature Methods on April 26, 2009. “What we’ve done is develop a much faster system that allows you to look at live cells expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP), which is a very powerful tool for labeling inside the cell,” explained UGA engineer Peter Kner.
www.engineering.uga.edu


New Type of Imaging: Fastest Camera

Mai 4, 2009

Researchers at the UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles, US) Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have developed the serial time-encoded amplified microscopy (STEAM) technology. It is a novel, continuously running camera that enables real-time imaging at a frame rate of more than 6 MHz and a shutter speed of less than 450ps – roughly a thousand times faster than any conventional camera. Keisuke Goda, Kevin Tsia and team leader Bahram Jalali describe a new approach that does not require a traditional CCD (charge-couples device) or CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) video camera. The new imager operates by capturing each picture with an ultrashort laser pulse. It then converts each pulse to a serial data stream that resembles the data in a fiber optic network rather than the signal coming out of the camera. Using a technique known as amplified dispersive Fourier transform, these laser pulses, each containing an entire picture, are amplified and simultaneously stretched in time to the point that they are slow enough to be captured with an electronic digitizer. Those cameras could be used for observing high-speed events such as shockwaves, communication between cells, neural activity or laser surgery.
www.ucla.edu


European Biophysics Congress

März 24, 2009

The 7th European Biophysics Congress will take place in Genoa, Italy from July 11-15, 2009. The congress is organized on behalf of the Italian Society of Pure and Applied Biophysics (SIBPA) and the European Biophysics Societies Association (EBSA). It address to representatives from academic and industrial institutions.

Conference topics include:

1. Single molecule biophysics
2. Lipid biophysics
3. Folding/unfolding of proteins
4. Multiscale simulation
5. Chromatin, nucleosomes and molecular machines
6. Glycobiophysics
7. Biomolecular self-assembly
8. Photosensory biophysics
9. Structure-function relationships (channels, pumps, exchangers)
10. Live cell imaging
11. Protein-ligand interactions
12. Membrane microdomains and signalling
13. Biological motility and molecular motors
14. Interaction and recognition of DNA
15. Biomaterials and drug delivery
16. Single molecule fluorescence
17. Imaging and spectroscopy
18. Fluorescent proteins
19. Solar energy conversion and photosynthesis
20. Statistical, soft matter and biological physics
21. Condensed colloidal phase in biology
22. Ion channels in channelopathies and cancer
23. RNA world
24. Stem cells

www.ebsa2009.org

biophysics-congress-genova