3D in 12 Days

April 30, 2009

During June, 13-25, the 14th annual Living Cell Course will take place at the University of British Columbia Medicine School (UBC) in Vancouver, Canada. This residential course concentrates on all aspects of the 3D microscopy of living cells. Designed for biological research scientists and advanced graduate students, who apply – or plan to – modern 3D imaging, the course want to open up-to-date methods to a wider selection of scientists. The aim of this intense course is to bring students and manufacturers together. The course’s topics include amongst others scanning systems like AODs, mirrors and disks, deconvolution of wide-field and confocal data, dye design, poisson noise QE and S/N, calcium imaging, as well as „how to keep cells alive“.
www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/index.htm

Vancouver, Canada (sorce: pixelio.de)

Vancouver, Canada (sorce: pixelio.de)


The Smallest Periscope

März 11, 2009

A team of Vanderbilt scientists have invented the world’s smallest version of the periscope and are using it to look at cells and other microorganisms from several sides at once. The researchers have dubbed their devices „mirrored pyramidal wells.“ They consist of pyramidal-shaped cavities molded into silicon whose interior surfaces are coated with a reflective layer of gold or platinum. They are in dimension about the width of a human hair and can be made in a range of sizes to view different-sized objects. When a cell is placed in such a well and viewed with a regular optical microscope, the researcher can see not only the top of the cell, but several sides simultaneously. „This is something biologists almost never see,“ says team member Chris Janetopoulos, assistant professor of biological sciences.
The Vanderbilt group is not the first to make microscopic pyramidal wells, but it is the first to apply them to make 3D images of microorganisms. In 2006, a group of scientists in England created pyramidal micromirrors and applied them to trapping atoms. And last spring researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology used similar structures to track nanoparticles.
www.vanderbilt.edu

Taken by Kevin Seale, Vanderbilt Institute for Integrative Biosystems Research and Education

Sunflower pollen, taken by Kevin Seale, Vanderbilt Institute for Integrative Biosystems Research and Education