4th CeBiTec Symposium: BioImaging

Juni 18, 2009

Microscopy has contributed immensely to the development of modern biology since 1665 when Robert Hooke published his book „Micrographia“ depicting a large number of microscopical sketches. In our days a major breakthrough in biology is the discovery of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Another important innovation was found by the german scientist Stefan Hell from Göttingen. He received for example the „Leibniz Preis“ of the German research community (DFG) for „light microscopy with unknown clarity“. These methods enable the visualization of nanoscopic structures in living cells.

Similar high magnification microscopic plus latest electronmicroscopic techniques are also being developed in the department of physics at the University of Bielefeld. A third building block will lead from August 25-28, 2009 from microscopy to imaging.

The topics include:

– Beyond Optical Microscopy
– High Resolution Microscopy in Biology
– From Life Cell Imaging to Systems Biology
– Bioimaging Informatics

The registration is open until July 11, 2009.

www.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de/symposium/bioimaging

bioImaging 2009

bioImaging 2009

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Partial Wave Spectroscopic Microscopy

März 16, 2009

A team of researchers led by Vadim Backman, professor of biomedical engineering of the Northwestern University, has developed a way to examine cell biopsies and detect never before seen signs of early-stage pancreatic cancer, according to a new paper published online by the OSA journal Optics Letters. The new technique, called „partial wave spectroscopic microscopy“ detects fluctuations in the cells‘ refractive index (an optical property that measure how cells bend light passing through them). These fluctuations are influenced by nanoscopic changes to the cells‘ interior architecture that often occur much earlier than the changes pathologists can detect under their microscopes. The more architectural disorder there is inside the cell, the more the refractive index fluctuates. The researchers showed that by quantifying these fluctuations, partial wave microscopy could identify cancer cells even in cases where they had not been detected by pathologists. Now, the partial wave spectroscopic microscopy has to prove effective in double-blind clinical trails.
www.northwestern.edu