First Taiwan AFM Bioworkshop

Juni 30, 2009

Asylum Research, in conjunction with the National Health Research Institutes (NHRI), will host the first Taiwan AFM Bioworkshop to be held July 30-31, 2009 at NHRI, Zhunan Campus, in Taiwan. The workshop will combine talks from leading researchers and industry experts on atomic force microscopy for life science applications, as well as instructional AFM demonstrations. Topics covered include principles of AFM, biological imaging, force spectroscopy, integration of AFM and optical microscopy, sample preparation, application examples and future directions in AFM. The event is free to all researchers in the field of AFM.
www.asylumresearch.com/bioworkshop


4th CeBiTec Symposium: BioImaging

Juni 18, 2009

Microscopy has contributed immensely to the development of modern biology since 1665 when Robert Hooke published his book „Micrographia“ depicting a large number of microscopical sketches. In our days a major breakthrough in biology is the discovery of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Another important innovation was found by the german scientist Stefan Hell from Göttingen. He received for example the „Leibniz Preis“ of the German research community (DFG) for „light microscopy with unknown clarity“. These methods enable the visualization of nanoscopic structures in living cells.

Similar high magnification microscopic plus latest electronmicroscopic techniques are also being developed in the department of physics at the University of Bielefeld. A third building block will lead from August 25-28, 2009 from microscopy to imaging.

The topics include:

– Beyond Optical Microscopy
– High Resolution Microscopy in Biology
– From Life Cell Imaging to Systems Biology
– Bioimaging Informatics

The registration is open until July 11, 2009.

www.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de/symposium/bioimaging

bioImaging 2009

bioImaging 2009


Molecular Light Switches for Higher Resolution

Mai 29, 2009

The “Superresolution” research network, founded by the German Ministry of Education and Sciences, demonstrated a new widefield microscopy technology with resolutions better than 20 nanometers. The method is based on special dyes, which’s fluorescence can be optically and reversibly switched on and off in aqueous solutions. The dyes are bond to cellular structures by using a functional group. By switching the dyes on and off, the fluorescence emission is separated in time until only those dye molecules fluoresce that have enough distance to allow their localization as single molecules. After several thousand switching cycles, a total image is constructed (dSTORM – direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy). Involved in the project were the work groups of Prof. Dr. M. Sauer and Prof. Dr. J. Mattay (University of Bielefeld, Germany ), Prof. Dr. K.-H. Drexhage (University of Siegen, Germany), Prof. Dr. J. Enderlein (University of Goettingen, Germany), and Prof. Dr. S. Hell (Max Planck Institute of Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen, Germany).
www.biophotonik.org

Cytoskeleton of a fixed cell. Left: Fluorescence image at standard conditions. Right: dSTORM image using molecular switches.

Cytoskeleton of a fixed cell. Left: Fluorescence image at standard conditions. Right: dSTORM image using molecular switches.


Lasers and Electro-Optics in Baltimore

Mai 27, 2009

The 2009 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) and The International Quantum Electronics Conference (IQEC) will come to Baltimore Convention Center, US from May 31 to June 5, 2009. The 5-day event features high-quality, cutting-edge optics and photonics programming, tutorials, special symposia, short courses and a full program of networking and social events. PhotonXpo – the exhibit at CLEO, also debuting this year, will feature 350 participating companies showcasing every facet of the optics and photonics industry.
www.cleoconference.org

The Baltimore Convention Center

The Baltimore Convention Center


New Cloaking Technology

Mai 26, 2009

Researchers of Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, US announced that they have created a new type of invisibility cloak which works for all colors of the visible spectrum. This new technology, based on a tapered optical waveguide, is simpler than previous designs and makes it possible to cloak objects of about 50 microns in diameter – roughly the width of a human hair. „All previous attempts at optical cloaking have involved very complicated nanofabrication of metamaterials containing many elements, which makes it very difficult to cloak large objects,“ said Vladimir Shalaev, Purdue University’s Robert and Anne Burnett Professor of Electrical Engineering. „Here, we showed that if a waveguide is tapered properly it acts like a sophisticated nanostructured material.” Previous experiments with metamaterials have been limited to cloaking regions only a few times larger than the wavelengths of visible light. This findings could lead to advances in e.g. cloaking; powerful “hyperlenses” resulting in microscopes 10 times more powerful than today’s; computers and consumer electronics that use light instead of electronic signals to process information; advanced sensors; and more efficient solar collectors. Findings are detailed in a research paper appearing May, 29 in Physical Review Letters.
www.purdue.edu


New Technique to Receive Sharper Images

April 29, 2009

A new imaging method that could help to build more powerful microscopes and other optical devices by producing sharper images and a wider field of view has been developed by Princeton researches. The research was led by Jason Fleischer, assistant professor of electrical engineering and co-written with two graduate students Christopher Barsi and Wenjie Wan. The new method takes advantage of the unusual properties of nonlinear optical materials in which light rays mix with each other in complex ways. Thanks to the mixing of rays, information that would otherwise be lost manages to reach the detector. Therefore this picture would be rich in detail but it would also be distorted. To capture this otherwise lost visual information, the researchers used a hologram. The hologram is a special type of photograph which records „phase“ – a light property which measures the time and location of a wave peak. They also combined data from a normal camera. Then they created a simplified flow of light through a nonlinear material and developed a computer algorithm that takes the distorted image and works backwards to calculate the visual information at every point in space between the image and the object.
www.princeton.edu

An object illuminated by light reflects rays in many different directions (gray arrows). Left: With a normal lens, some rays are captured and refract towards a camera while others are missed, resulting in a blurry image with a limited field of view. Right: The new method uses a nonlinear material. The original rays are altered and new rays (red) are generated. The resulting picture is scrambled, but a computer algorithm can undo the mixing and yield a sharp, wide-field image.

An object illuminated by light reflects rays in many different directions (gray arrows). Left: With a normal lens, some rays are captured and refract towards a camera while others are missed, resulting in a blurry image with a limited field of view. Right: The new method uses a nonlinear material. The original rays are altered and new rays (red) are generated. The resulting picture is scrambled, but a computer algorithm can undo the mixing and yield a sharp, wide-field image. (Image: Christopher Barsi)


SPIE Europe Optics and Optoelectronics

April 16, 2009

New applications for EUV, VUV, and x-ray technologies and other topics in photonics will be among highlights of SPIE Europe Optics and Optoelectronics to be held April 20-23, 2009 in Prague, Czech Republic. Approximately 450 papers will be presented in 10 technical conferences on:

– Harnessing Relativistic Plasma Waves as Novel Radiation Sources from Terahertz to X-rays and Beyond
– EUV and X-ray Optics: Synergy between Laboratory and Space
– Damage to VUV, EUV, and X-ray Optics
– Metamaterials
– Nonlinear Optics and Applications
– Photon Counting Applications
– Quantum Optics and Quantum Information Transfer and Processing
– Optical Sensors
– Photonic Crystal Fibres
– Holography: Advances in Classical Holography and Modern Trends

www.spie.org/optics-optoelectronics.xml

Prague, Czech Republic (source: pixelio.de)

Prague, Czech Republic (source: pixelio.de)